We all have goals, yet many of us don’t meet them. Sometimes this is disappointing, but more often than not the bar just kind of moves down, time passes, and we become complacent.

Why?

Because it is pretty tough to stay focused for long periods of time on “Big Hairy Audacious Goals”.

So what can you do to meet your goals?

Just like it doesn’t work to wait till the end of a release to power through the requirements in a traditional waterfall, it doesn’t work to wait till the end of the day to power through your tasks. Instead of powering out of the day, focus on powering into your morning.

I once heard a CEO tell his company a story to motivate them. It was January and the year was just kicking off. He said “If we want to meet our annual goals, we have to meet our quarterly goals. If we want to meet our quarterly goals, then we have to meet our monthly goals. In order to meet our monthly goals we have to meet our weekly goals, and to meet our weekly goals we have to win each day.” He said to forget everything else and just win the day. He then went on to explain the origin of the mantra.

If you follow college football, you may be familiar with the Oregon Duck’s mantra “Win the Day.” Most football coaches at whatever level preach about just focusing on the next game and not looking past it. When Chip Kelly began coaching at Oregon, he began preaching for players to just “win the day” because he believed the team needed to strive to win at every sprint, study session and scrimmage in order to win the next game.

This story and mantra resonated with my agile roots. Agile is rooted in focusing on the day to achieve the end goal. Agile’s foundation is built around not over planning to meet the final goal, but taking each day as it comes and responding accordingly. Stand-ups are all about teams winning the day.

Truthfully, as inspiring as this story was, I had come to forget about it till the other day when I was working out at the gym and listening to a podcast in which an author was discussing their book The Miracle Morning. The book is about six practices people can do every morning to be more productive, successful and happy. During the interview, the author started talking about the “how to win the day” mantra and how, if you want to win the day, you have to win the morning.

This snapped me out of my workout. On the surface, it would seem that the author just took something successful and took it one level down, but to me it was brilliant and once again aligned to my agile roots.

At work we are so often bombarded by firefighting that we fail to focus on our original goals or tasks. Agile, of course, employs story cards and stand-ups to combat these and other distractions. Most teams hold their stand-ups in the morning to kick the day off right.

Despite all of this, I had never thought about these practices being designed to help us win the morning so that we would win the day and ultimately win the end goal, but that is what they do. So, now I want to think about other things our teams can do first thing in the morning to ensure that we win the day – because to win the day, you have to win the morning.

728x90-red-demo

Join the Discussion

    There are currently no comments.

    63 − = 62